EVO

Size

140mm

Recommended Powertrain

3035 quad blade

1407 ~3800kv

12A 4in1

650mah 4S

Build difficulty level:

Expert

COMPLETE BUILD GUIDE

Do not allow any chemicals to contact the frame. Specifically; Loctite, any type of paint, nail polish, chemical cleaning products, as well as corrosive and/or toxic gases. Any contact can create localised chemical changes in the plastic and cause it to break under high stress loads. If kept clean and away from such chemicals, it will retain it’s jelly-like chemistry and resist breakage throughout a significantly higher number of impacts than carbon fibre.
Do not fasten bolts as tight as you would on carbon fibre. Overly tight bolts on either the motors or centre apply localised stress pressure that changes the load bearing capability of the plastic, causing it to break easily. Polycarbonate also ‘grips’ to metals at the molecular level when the correct amount of pressure is applied, providing a similar benefit to loctite. Tighten bolts by hand, until you feel the resistance increase exponentially over 1/2 a turn of the driver. Stop at that point and do not over tighten.

INTRODUCTION


 

The Autek Micro is our most fun quadcopter!  It’s also an incredibly rewarding build.

This tiny quad is perfectly suited for fun flying around playgrounds, parks, under trees, flips, loops, freestyle, etc.  At the same time it’s a very capable, agile and fast racing quadcopter.  The frame and pod are designed for toughness, durability and performance.

With battery, in flight trim, it weighs only 200g; 140g without battery.

The frame is 6mm polycarbonate.  Motor holes are 140mm apart, 2mm diameter at 12×12 centres, for 1306 / 1407 motors.

The pod is custom designed for 20×20 flight controllers, and is a perfect fit for the Eachine VTX03 micro VTx.  Channels can be changed and VTx status seen through the hole in the top.  The lens opening is deliberately wide at top, allowing air to flow over the VTx.

The pod is also a perfect fit for the Runcam Micro Swift (V1 or V2) CCD FPV camera.  We recommend the wider (160 degree) lens.  Camera angle is fixed at 45 degrees.

The pod has a hole for the dipole antenna that comes with the VTX03 and slots for a uFL connected micro clover leaf antenna.  The dipole works great and I’d recommend it, you won’t break it and video is very good for the close quarters kind of flying this quad is intended for.

Note that internal space is 30x30mm and only 20mm high.  You will make the most compact build ever!

The ESC should be an inboard 4in1 with 20×20 hole centres, e.g. the Racerstar 12A 4in1.

Any 20×20 FC should work.  I’ve had good results with Furious Piko F3 and F4 boards to date.

Your receiver must be small, no bigger than a Frsky XSR.

This quad performs best with small, very high KV 1407 motors (e.g. the RCX 1407 3800kV), matched to Gemfan 3035×4 props.  There are lots of good motors out there, but probably no better prop for very high kV.  The Gemfan 3035 tri-blades in the photos are a bit slower than the quad blade variant. If you choose lower kV motors you may be able to use some of the higher pitch 3” props.

The best battery is a good 650mAh 75C; any bigger and the lovely light nimble flight characteristics suffer.  With a Tattu 75C 650 you’ll complete a typical outdoor race on near full-throttle without problems, or enjoy 4 minutes freestyle quite easily.

PRE-REQUISITES


 

This is not an easy build, even for an experienced constructor.  It is not plug and play  🙂

Expert soldering ability, including being able to remove micro JST sockets and solder individual wires to those tiny pads is necessary.

When finished, everything is a very tight, but perfect fit.  You’ll have an ultra-reliable crash-proof quad that will give you hours of enjoyment.

When soldering interconnect wires, be sure to use 11×0.3mm 30 gauge silicone insulated hookup wire.  PVC wire is just too difficult to work with, and prone to failure  You won’t need much wire.  Enough is provided with the camera and ESC.  If you need more, follow the link at the end.  Most cheap 30G silicon wire has only 7 strands; 11-strand is much better.

AUTEK NANO

PARTS LIST

If you're a beginner and follow this build guide and parts list in exact detail, it will result in a high performance and highly reliable quad. If you're an experienced builder and want to use other parts, go for it! They can definitely work as well. However, you will need to use your experience to tune and set up the system, as some elements of this build will change.

PROVIDED PARTS

Frame – 6mm polycarbonate

Motor screws – 2mm philips drive stainless steel

Pod – 3D printed TPU

Pod mounting screws – M2x15mm, screw directly into the TPU of the pod.

Male 2-pin JST1.25 flying lead to power the camera/VTx

Camera mounting screws – M2x5mm.  Do not use longer screws or you may damage the camera; shorter won’t quite be long enough.

ADDITIONAL REQUIRED PARTS

Motors: any 1306-1408 motor to suit 12×12 2mm holes.  RCX 1407 at 3800 kV  recommended

ESC: RacerStar 12A 4in1 with side exiting motor wires, or equivalent.

FC: 20×20 hole size F3 or F3 board, e.g. Furious Piko F3 or F4 both with MPU6000 gyros, which have worked well for me.

Rx: Micro full telemetry receiver like the FrSky XSR.  An XSR is about as big as will fit.  Soldering one extra wire to the XSR provides inverted SPort for F4 boards that lack it.  Other options include Frsky XM, Spectrum satellites etc.

VTx: Eachine VTX03.  The is a perfect fit in the pod.  I can’t recommend any other, but the available space can be hacked to fit other micro VTx’s.

Video camera: Runcam Micro Swift (V1 or V2) with the wide angle lens, or the same size Foxeer equivalent. These just push in perfectly.

REQUIRED CONSUMABLES

Fine silicone hookup wire (provided with Runcam and Racerstar 4in1)

Nylon bolts, spacers and nuts to mount the 4in1

Silicone wire insulation off old 12AWG Lipo battery wire (used to make soft spacers)

SMD solder paste, temperature controlled fine chisel tip soldering iron, steady hand

Temperature controlled hot air gun, ideally a low airflow hot air rework station type, to melt tiny bits of hot melt glue onto wherever wires are soldered to the boards

Magnifying glasses – cheap 2x or 3x readers are great

Fine heat shrink

Heat shrink to re-encase the Rx

Autek Xracing quads are quite different to standard builds, using the right tools makes it so much easier

More than anything, the tool we depend on most is something that comes from medical surgery – Artery Forceps. They come in many variants and sizes, and are quite cheap.

IMPORTANT!

Several stages of our builds require holding things that are just too small for our fingers, that is where the artery forceps are used. It makes the build that much easier, I won’t build without them. Some people use a product called helping hands, you could also use tweezers, or blue tac. If you’re someone who has a lot of hand shake or just had a late night, blue tac is the best option. 

HEAT

  • Soldering station w/ chisel tip
  • Temp. controlled hot air gun
  • Hot glue gun (optional)
  • Hot keratin gun (optional)

CUTTERS

  • Side cutters
  • Scissors
  • Razor blade

DRIVERS

  • Small philips head driver
  • M2 hex driver
  • M3 hex driver
  • M5 hex driver

OTHERS

  • Artery Forceps
  • Blue Tac

Build stages in sequence:

Frame & motor mounting

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Do not use loctite
Do not overtighten
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ESC, LiPo & Powertrain Assembly

The RacerStart 12A 4in1 ESC is reliable, cool running board. It works well without additional capacitors with 1407’s.

Before removing the heat shrink, photograph the board so you know which wire belongs to which output pin. The motor connections will be soldered last, don’t worry about them at this point.

The ESC will be mounted with the LiPo connection downwards, i.e., normal side up. There is room for the signal wire plug and socket, so it doesn’t have to be removed.

However, that connector is a bit fragile, and I personally prefer to remove it and direct solder the wires. This is optional.

This is how to remove it. It comes off easily since the pins are surface mounted. They pins will probably break off as you chip the plastic off with snips, if not they are easily removed with a soldering iron. It’s tricky to solder wires to such tiny pads. Pre-tin your wires and use plenty of SMD solder paste and a small chisel or bevel tip iron. Tin the pads, put the SMD paste on, then start with the pad furthest away. Get comfortable and have your wrists resting on something. Use magnifying glasses. Start with the most difficult / furthest away wire first. Heat the pad until solder melts on it, then carefully drop the wire on the pad. You only need the four signal wires, not the ground.

When all four signal wires are done hot melt glue them neatly in place.

The LiPo wires will get pulled on when the battery ejects in a hard crash. The pads are very small and it would be easy for them to get ripped off accidentally. If you look closely, you can see that there is a bit more pad on the board that they don’t use. It’s covered in paint but forms part of the same pad. De-solder the supplied LiPo wires, scrape that paint carefully off to expose more of the pad, and re-solder them over a bigger area, preferably a bit closer to the centre of the board. Try to get the LiPo wires to exit at an angle such that they would be flush with the frame once mounted upside down. See the photo below.

Trim the LiPo wires relatively short, about 45mm long all up.

Since the ESC is going to be used as the PDB, we need to get LiPo voltage from it to the FC. There are no pads on the Racerstar for this purpose.

You can connect the FC power wires by piggy-back soldering them to the main battery connection point, but be quick or the extra heat can weaken an otherwise good lipo connection. To find alternative points, use a multimeter to trace positive and ground. Often a nearby input filtering capacitor is a good place to get lipo power from.

If you will add some12V LED strips under the rear arms, you’ll need to solder some wires to LiPo ground and power on the ESC. Find a place where you can neatly solder two pairs of silicone wires and direct them over the back of the board, where they will exit via the hole in the frame to the bottom of the rear arms.

Note which set of motor outputs will go to which motor, and write down the color of the wire going to what will end up being motor number 1, 2, 3 and 4.

You should now have an ESC with a LiPo connection, four signal wires, four output wires to LEDs, and a place to solder your FC power wires. Almost done!

Flight Controller, Radio Control & Telemetry

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VTX & Camera

The RacerStart 12A 4in1 ESC is reliable, cool running board. It works well without additional capacitors with 1407’s.

Before removing the heat shrink, photograph the board so you know which wire belongs to which output pin. The motor connections will be soldered last, don’t worry about them at this point.

The ESC will be mounted with the LiPo connection downwards, i.e., normal side up. There is room for the signal wire plug and socket, so it doesn’t have to be removed.

However, that connector is a bit fragile, and I personally prefer to remove it and direct solder the wires. This is optional.

This is how to remove it. It comes off easily since the pins are surface mounted. They pins will probably break off as you chip the plastic off with snips, if not they are easily removed with a soldering iron. It’s tricky to solder wires to such tiny pads. Pre-tin your wires and use plenty of SMD solder paste and a small chisel or bevel tip iron. Tin the pads, put the SMD paste on, then start with the pad furthest away. Get comfortable and have your wrists resting on something. Use magnifying glasses. Start with the most difficult / furthest away wire first. Heat the pad until solder melts on it, then carefully drop the wire on the pad. You only need the four signal wires, not the ground.

When all four signal wires are done hot melt glue them neatly in place.

The LiPo wires will get pulled on when the battery ejects in a hard crash. The pads are very small and it would be easy for them to get ripped off accidentally. If you look closely, you can see that there is a bit more pad on the board that they don’t use. It’s covered in paint but forms part of the same pad. De-solder the supplied LiPo wires, scrape that paint carefully off to expose more of the pad, and re-solder them over a bigger area, preferably a bit closer to the centre of the board. Try to get the LiPo wires to exit at an angle such that they would be flush with the frame once mounted upside down. See the photo below.

Trim the LiPo wires relatively short, about 45mm long all up.

Since the ESC is going to be used as the PDB, we need to get LiPo voltage from it to the FC. There are no pads on the Racerstar for this purpose.

You can connect the FC power wires by piggy-back soldering them to the main battery connection point, but be quick or the extra heat can weaken an otherwise good lipo connection. To find alternative points, use a multimeter to trace positive and ground. Often a nearby input filtering capacitor is a good place to get lipo power from.

If you will add some12V LED strips under the rear arms, you’ll need to solder some wires to LiPo ground and power on the ESC. Find a place where you can neatly solder two pairs of silicone wires and direct them over the back of the board, where they will exit via the hole in the frame to the bottom of the rear arms.

Note which set of motor outputs will go to which motor, and write down the color of the wire going to what will end up being motor number 1, 2, 3 and 4.

You should now have an ESC with a LiPo connection, four signal wires, four output wires to LEDs, and a place to solder your FC power wires. Almost done!

Pod & Final assembly

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Flight Controller & ESC Flashing & Settings

The RacerStart 12A 4in1 ESC is reliable, cool running board. It works well without additional capacitors with 1407’s.

Before removing the heat shrink, photograph the board so you know which wire belongs to which output pin. The motor connections will be soldered last, don’t worry about them at this point.

The ESC will be mounted with the LiPo connection downwards, i.e., normal side up. There is room for the signal wire plug and socket, so it doesn’t have to be removed.

However, that connector is a bit fragile, and I personally prefer to remove it and direct solder the wires. This is optional.

This is how to remove it. It comes off easily since the pins are surface mounted. They pins will probably break off as you chip the plastic off with snips, if not they are easily removed with a soldering iron. It’s tricky to solder wires to such tiny pads. Pre-tin your wires and use plenty of SMD solder paste and a small chisel or bevel tip iron. Tin the pads, put the SMD paste on, then start with the pad furthest away. Get comfortable and have your wrists resting on something. Use magnifying glasses. Start with the most difficult / furthest away wire first. Heat the pad until solder melts on it, then carefully drop the wire on the pad. You only need the four signal wires, not the ground.

When all four signal wires are done hot melt glue them neatly in place.

The LiPo wires will get pulled on when the battery ejects in a hard crash. The pads are very small and it would be easy for them to get ripped off accidentally. If you look closely, you can see that there is a bit more pad on the board that they don’t use. It’s covered in paint but forms part of the same pad. De-solder the supplied LiPo wires, scrape that paint carefully off to expose more of the pad, and re-solder them over a bigger area, preferably a bit closer to the centre of the board. Try to get the LiPo wires to exit at an angle such that they would be flush with the frame once mounted upside down. See the photo below.

Trim the LiPo wires relatively short, about 45mm long all up.

Since the ESC is going to be used as the PDB, we need to get LiPo voltage from it to the FC. There are no pads on the Racerstar for this purpose.

You can connect the FC power wires by piggy-back soldering them to the main battery connection point, but be quick or the extra heat can weaken an otherwise good lipo connection. To find alternative points, use a multimeter to trace positive and ground. Often a nearby input filtering capacitor is a good place to get lipo power from.

If you will add some12V LED strips under the rear arms, you’ll need to solder some wires to LiPo ground and power on the ESC. Find a place where you can neatly solder two pairs of silicone wires and direct them over the back of the board, where they will exit via the hole in the frame to the bottom of the rear arms.

Note which set of motor outputs will go to which motor, and write down the color of the wire going to what will end up being motor number 1, 2, 3 and 4.

You should now have an ESC with a LiPo connection, four signal wires, four output wires to LEDs, and a place to solder your FC power wires. Almost done!

Final system check & test arming

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Check motor temp

Maiden Flight

The RacerStart 12A 4in1 ESC is reliable, cool running board. It works well without additional capacitors with 1407’s.

Before removing the heat shrink, photograph the board so you know which wire belongs to which output pin. The motor connections will be soldered last, don’t worry about them at this point.

The ESC will be mounted with the LiPo connection downwards, i.e., normal side up. There is room for the signal wire plug and socket, so it doesn’t have to be removed.

However, that connector is a bit fragile, and I personally prefer to remove it and direct solder the wires. This is optional.

This is how to remove it. It comes off easily since the pins are surface mounted. They pins will probably break off as you chip the plastic off with snips, if not they are easily removed with a soldering iron. It’s tricky to solder wires to such tiny pads. Pre-tin your wires and use plenty of SMD solder paste and a small chisel or bevel tip iron. Tin the pads, put the SMD paste on, then start with the pad furthest away. Get comfortable and have your wrists resting on something. Use magnifying glasses. Start with the most difficult / furthest away wire first. Heat the pad until solder melts on it, then carefully drop the wire on the pad. You only need the four signal wires, not the ground.

When all four signal wires are done hot melt glue them neatly in place.

The LiPo wires will get pulled on when the battery ejects in a hard crash. The pads are very small and it would be easy for them to get ripped off accidentally. If you look closely, you can see that there is a bit more pad on the board that they don’t use. It’s covered in paint but forms part of the same pad. De-solder the supplied LiPo wires, scrape that paint carefully off to expose more of the pad, and re-solder them over a bigger area, preferably a bit closer to the centre of the board. Try to get the LiPo wires to exit at an angle such that they would be flush with the frame once mounted upside down. See the photo below.

Trim the LiPo wires relatively short, about 45mm long all up.

Since the ESC is going to be used as the PDB, we need to get LiPo voltage from it to the FC. There are no pads on the Racerstar for this purpose.

You can connect the FC power wires by piggy-back soldering them to the main battery connection point, but be quick or the extra heat can weaken an otherwise good lipo connection. To find alternative points, use a multimeter to trace positive and ground. Often a nearby input filtering capacitor is a good place to get lipo power from.

If you will add some12V LED strips under the rear arms, you’ll need to solder some wires to LiPo ground and power on the ESC. Find a place where you can neatly solder two pairs of silicone wires and direct them over the back of the board, where they will exit via the hole in the frame to the bottom of the rear arms.

Note which set of motor outputs will go to which motor, and write down the color of the wire going to what will end up being motor number 1, 2, 3 and 4.

You should now have an ESC with a LiPo connection, four signal wires, four output wires to LEDs, and a place to solder your FC power wires. Almost done!